Archive for September, 2007

Going Forward to the Past

Monday, September 10th, 2007

My BS detectors start clanging loudly when I hear the phrase “going forward.” The clanging tells me that the speaker is trying to sound knowledgeable by using obfuscation.

(more…)

Hydro Lake Storage Improves

Monday, September 10th, 2007

Hydro lake storage declined slightly in terms of volume during August 2007, but improved in percentage terms for the time of year. With demand steady and generally below-average inflows, a storm delivered a bonus with whopping inflows on the 11th and 12th.

(more…)

The 1883 Krakatau Eruption – A Colonial View

Sunday, September 9th, 2007

The dramatic eruption which destroyed the island volcano of Krakatau (Krakatoa) on the 27th of August 1883 was the culmination of a three-month period of heightened activity.

(more…)

August 2007 Dry and Calm

Friday, September 7th, 2007

Tawa’s climate during August 2007 was much drier and calmer than last August, with temperatures typical for the time of year.

(more…)

Tectonic Ping-Pong

Wednesday, September 5th, 2007

Last night’s magnitude 5.3 earthquake south of the Kermadec Islands provoked a quick response from New Zealand’s south, in an effect that I call tectonic ping-pong.

(more…)

Geological Summary for New Zealand Area, July 2007

Wednesday, September 5th, 2007

Earthquake activity continued at a low level, and activity associated with the Matata earthquake swarm virtually ceased. White Island, Mt Ngauruhoe, and Mt Ruapehu remained at Alert Level 1.

(more…)

Southern Kermadec Quake

Wednesday, September 5th, 2007

A shallow magnitude 5.3 earthquake struck 190 km SSW of L’Esperance Rock in the southern Kermadec Islands (680 km north-east of Auckland) at 9:42 p.m. on Tuesday 4th September 2007 NZST at a depth of 19 km.

[Compiled from data supplied by the US Geological Survey and its contributing agencies.]

Quake Activity Near Fiji Microplates Continues

Tuesday, September 4th, 2007

Earthquake activity near the western boundary of the Fiji Microplates has continued since Sunday’s magnitude 6.9 quake in the Santa Cruz Islands.

(more…)

Earthquake and Tsunami, Santa Cruz Islands

Sunday, September 2nd, 2007

This afternoon’s under-sea earthquake in the Santa Cruz Islands has been revised to magnitude 6.9 following further analysis.

The Pacific Tsunami Warning Centre (PTWC) issued a bulletin at 4:26 this afternoon advising that a 4 cm sea-level change was detected by a wave gauge at Vanuatu at 3:39 p.m. New Zealand time, just over 2½ hours after the earthquake occurred. It is speculated that the wave may have been generated by a slower rupture in the earthquake zone.

It is still not known whether a damaging wave was generated near the earthquake epicentre. However, the waves measured 26 minutes apart near Vanuatu confirm that a tsunami threat does not exisit for other coastal areas in the Pacific, according to the PTWC. Nevertheless, some areas may experience small non-destructive sea level changes lasting up to several hours.

The US Geological Survey has reported two aftershocks of magnitude 5.4 and 4.8 at shallow depths in the Santa Cruz Islands since the main quake.

[Compiled from data supplied by the US Geological Survey and its contributing agencies, and the U.S. National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration’s Pacific Tsunami Warning Centre.]

Major Earthquake, Santa Cruz Islands

Sunday, September 2nd, 2007

A major shallow earthquake struck the Santa Cruz Islands, early this afternoon.

Early reports put the quake’s magnitude between 6.9 and 7.4 at a depth of 35 km. The earthquake, which struck at 1:05 p.m. New Zealand time on Sunday September 2nd, 2007 was located 95 km south of Lata in the Santa Cruz Islands in the Solomons.

The Pacific Tsunami Warning Centre issued a bulletin at 1:21 p.m. indicating that a widespread tsunami event was unlikely, but a local wave may have been generated.

Today’s earthquake follows a magnitude 4.9 quake on Friday and a magnitude 5.1 quake on Thusday in locations very close to today’s event.

[Compiled from data supplied by the US Geological Survey and its contributing agencies, and the U.S. National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration’s Pacific Tsunami Warning Centre.]